CFAH

Having increased by an upwardly revised 6,600 in September, the net number of people living in San Francisco with a paycheck increased by 4,200 in October to 540,200, dropping the unemployment rate to 3.9 percent with 31,500 more employed residents in the city than there were at the same time last year. That being said, there are still 30,600 fewer employed people in San Francisco than there were prior to the pandemic and 21,800 fewer people in the labor force.

At the same time, the number of East Bay residents with a paycheck increased by 8,200 last month to 1,471,300, which equates to 45,900 more employed residents than there were at the same time last year but 88,200 fewer than there were prior to the pandemic, and 57,000 fewer people in the labor force, for an unemployment rate of 5.2 percent.

Employment in both San Mateo and Santa Clara ticked up last month as well, by 3,500 and 9,400 respectively. And as such, there are now 67,700 more employed people in the Valley (1,422,600) than there were at the same time last year but still 55,500 fewer employed people than there were prior to the pandemic, with 37,900 fewer people in the labor force (1,476,700) for an unemployment rate of 3.7 percent.

Total employment across Marin, Napa and Sonoma inched up by 700 in October to 436,300, which represents 21,800 more employed residents than at the same time last year. But there are still 17,400 fewer employed North Bay residents than prior to the pandemic with 11,700 fewer people in the combined labor force (454,700) for an average unemployment rate of 4.0 percent.

And as such, while 459,200 jobs have been recovered across the Bay Area since the start of the year, including 26,000 last month, and there are 166,900 more employed Bay Area residents than there were at the same time last year, there are still 191,700 fewer employed Bay Area residents (3,870,400) than there were prior to the pandemic having hit (4,062,100) and the labor force is down by 128,400 for an average unemployment rate of 4.3 percent versus 2.3 percent at the end of 2019.

Comments from Plugged-In Readers

  1. Posted by Notcom

    If the BA’s employment glass is filling up, it’s get-to-place-of-employment-on-mass-transit glass is still mostly empty. Or maybe it’s never going to be filled again. shot glass? thimble?

    • Posted by BobN

      Sad to see that their “welcome back” plan doesn’t include station cleaning.

      • Posted by Pablito

        They are finally reopening the station’s public bathrooms 20+ years after they closed them for 9/11/2001. Not that it made any sense to close them in the first place. Zero. It did nothing to stop terrorists and everything to do with BART management being cheap and lazy.

        Just like the workers not wanting crappy minimum wage jobs anymore, the generation of people who have put up with past BART incompetence is in no hurry to come back. I give it two years to see a full recovery to pre pandemic levels.

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