CFAH

We’ve seen plenty of examples of creep with respect to the number of new fireplaces and even fire pits, but we’re now starting to see it in terms of placement.

736 Castro Dining Room

And as the fireplaces get higher, outlets for hanging televisions are creeping up the wall as well.

736 Castro Bedroom

In addition to the two above, the classic treatment of the fireplace in the living room at 736 Castro Street does remain.

736 Castro Living Room

Comments from Plugged-In Readers

  1. Posted by Invented

    Having a tv above any fireplace looks tacky — and is ridiculous. I have three fireplaces; they’re floor level and there’s no need to position them for more attention . Sheesh.

  2. Posted by The Milkshake of Despair

    I thought that a fireplace creep was a smelly slovenly chimney sweep who oogled the ladies of the household with a lustful gaze.

    But seriously it is funny how a fireplace has gone from a utility to a decoration. Wood and coal stoked fireplaces needed to be at ground level for safety and ease of use. But gas simulacra have no such limitation. Any gas fireplace placed higher than 6 inches above the hearth should abandon any attempt to look like a solid fueled fireplace. Go wild with new fun flame patterns but don’t try to look like a legacy fireplace. Maybe we need a new term. Flame art? Burning painting? Visible space heater?

    • Posted by Sierrajeff

      ^^^ expensive luxury used less often than a carving knife, and twice as pointless.

      LOL on the “fireplace creep” comment, I had the same thought myself.

    • Posted by BobN

      I would think that another reason for ground-level placement would be to heat the cold air that sinks to the floor. If you place a heat source a few feet off the ground, the cold air would just pool below it, unless you also used a blower or a fan to circulate air in the room.

      • Posted by The Milkshake of Despair

        Good point and a good reason to locate gas fakerplaces low on the wall as well.

    • Posted by jlasf

      How about “incendiary art installation”? “Framed flame”? “Burning man-tle?”

      • Posted by The Milkshake of Despair

        Love it! The Burning Man-tle could include a miniature man surrounded by nekked flame dancers spinning fire balls.

  3. Posted by BobN

    The only time I’ve seen a TV placed above a fireplace in a way that would allow decent viewing, it was one of those faux fireplaces with alcohol flames and was very wide and short and low to the ground. The fireplace looked silly, but the TV angle was good.

  4. Posted by eddy

    You missed the 4th fire feature with the wood burning stove later in the pics. Ugh.

    The fireplace in the dining room is a disaster and serves zero purpose. I actually like the decorative nature of a properly positioned and installed modern gas fireplace and have no issues with them even if they are infrequently used. Most people don’t use their wood burning fireplaces. Firepits are one of the few outdoor features that make sense in San Francisco.

  5. Posted by Fishchum

    I’m constantly amazed at the staging I see in multi-million dollar homes in San Francisco with regards to flat screens and fireplaces. . It’s even more ridiculous when there’s a “media room” downstairs and the stagers have STILL mounted a flat screen above the fireplace in the upstairs living room. Invariably, I notice the agent is usually over the age of 55, and I’m wondering if they have any idea about modern day A/V placement and use. I’ll wager good money they’re probably the same people who complained about the “black bars” on their TV screens when letterboxed films were being played on the old tube television sets via VHS and DVD’s.

  6. Posted by SocketSite

    UPDATE: The sale of 736 Castro has closed escrow with a reported contract price of $2,300,000, one thousand dollars “over asking.”

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