CFAH

Book Concern Building #512 (www.SocketSite.com)

The final fifteen condominiums at Book Concern Building have been released and mostly studios remain. Official footprints are undeniably small (ranging from 256 to 500 square feet), but many of the units offer an additional 100+ square feet of loft storage space (i.e., unofficial sleeping space). And for the most part, the condos are well designed (although we’d upgrade a number of the finishes).

Overall, we’re fans.

Prices for the remaining units range from $258,000 to $451,000 (HOA dues from $275-$360/mo) and the building has received its temporary certificate of occupancy (i.e. you can close escrow and move in).  Gym, laundry, and “multi-purpose room” in the basement; deck on the roof; and a neighborhood that’s in transition.

A rundown of the remaining units:

∙ 83 Mcallister #409 (0/1) – $258,000
∙ 83 Mcallister #312 (0/1) – $260,000
∙ 83 Mcallister #412 (0/1) – $273,000
∙ 83 Mcallister #402 (0/1) – $273,000
∙ 83 Mcallister #202 (0/1) – $330,000
∙ 83 Mcallister #211 (0/1) – $335,000
∙ 83 Mcallister #210 (0/1) – $335,000
∙ 83 Mcallister #212 (0/1) – $345,000
∙ 83 Mcallister #301 (1/1) – $364,000
∙ 83 Mcallister #206 (2/1) – $397,000
∙ 83 Mcallister #512 (0/1) – $402,000
∙ 83 Mcallister #504 (0/1) – $407,000
∙ 83 Mcallister #505 (0/1) – $417,000
∙ 83 Mcallister #201 (1/1) – $441,000
∙ 83 Mcallister #208 (1/1) – $451,000

Comments from Plugged-In Readers

  1. Posted by Dude

    Thank you SocketSite for highlighting properties that the average San Franciscan can afford. Not exciting as some of the $2.3MM properties, to be sure. But it’s good to know there’s room in this city for those of us who make less than $500K/year (even though it’s only 500 square feet).
    [Editor’s Note: Our pleasure. Rest assured that we’re always looking for interesting opportunities, and real value, for the average San Franciscan (i.e., us).]

  2. Posted by erin

    Yikes, that is one teeny-tiny living space. Interesting that it will probably take two salaries to meet even the lowest asking price, but there would hardly be enough room for two people to live together.

  3. Posted by Kevin Montreuil

    While the condos are great, the commercial space 87-91 McAllister St. remains empty. In addition, the door wells have become a public nuisance, as homeless sleep, eat, drink, urinate and defecate in the door wells. What responsibility does the developer have regarding the public health menace their (vacant) commercial space creates?

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